Alabama's Choice for Prime Cuts

Frequently Asked Questions not usually found on other more conservative sites ...

Q. Where does the Tri-tip come from?
Ans. Tri-tip is from the 3rd or "tri" portion of the tip. The tip is really good meat, after all that's why it's at the tip.
Q. Why are cows bigger than chickens?
Ans. Because chickens are made of feathers and by their very nature feathers are light and small.
Q. What is Dry Aging?
Ans. Assuming you are not referring to retirees in Phoenix, all beef is aged to naturally tenderize the meat and enhance beef flavor. Beef is aged either by wet or dry methods. Wet aging is far more common and occurs in vacuum bags under refrigerated temperatures. Most beef you buy at your local grocer uses the wet aging process. Dry aging is not as widespread, and is a more complex method done under dry conditions. It is offered at high-end grocers and steakhouses, creating tender cuts of beef with distinct flavors and aromas.
Q. What do Proteins do for me?
Ans.
  • Protein plays many roles that help keep you energized and support your body’s functions
  • Proteins are part of all your body’s tissues, including muscles, organs and bones.
  • Proteins make up the hormones and enzymes that regulate body processes
  • Proteins work with the immune system to protect against disease
  • Proteins can even serve as an energy source
 
Q. Tell me more about the B-complex vitamins in beef
Ans.
  • Calorie-for-calorie, beef is one of the best protein sources of essential B-complex vitamins, including riboflavin, niacin, B6 and B12
  • Riboflavin, niacin and thiamin are three key vitamins in beef that help keep you boing by unleashing energy from the protein, carbohydrates and fats that you eat
  • Riboflavin also helps promote healthy skin, eyes and clear vision. To get the same amount of riboflavin found in a 3 oz. serving of beef, you’d need to consume more than two 3 oz. chicken breasts.
  • Thiamin also helps promote normal appetite and contributes to normal nervous system function
  • Vitamin B12, found only in animal food products, helps produce red blood cells. A 3 oz. serving of beef provides 37% of the Daily Value
  • Vitamin B6, along with B12, may play a role in preventing stroke and heart disease. A 3 oz. serving of beef provides 16% of the Daily Value

Q. How hot do I have to cook chicken so I don’t get sick?
Ans. That depends on how you serve it. The core temperature should reach 165 degrees, but if you serve your chicken with halibut and carmel sauce over croutons and licorice, you may still get sick from your chicken. Consult our recipe section if you think this might be an issue.
Q. Tell me more about the B-complex vitamins in beef
Ans.
  • Calorie-for-calorie, beef is one of the best protein sources of essential B-complex vitamins, including riboflavin, niacin, B6 and B12
  • Riboflavin, niacin and thiamin are three key vitamins in beef that help keep you boing by unleashing energy from the protein, carbohydrates and fats that you eat
  • Riboflavin also helps promote healthy skin, eyes and clear vision. To get the same amount of riboflavin found in a 3 oz. serving of beef, you’d need to consume more than two 3 oz. chicken breasts.
  • Thiamin also helps promote normal appetite and contributes to normal nervous system function
  • Vitamin B12, found only in animal food products, helps produce red blood cells. A 3 oz. serving of beef provides 37% of the Daily Value
  • Vitamin B6, along with B12, may play a role in preventing stroke and heart disease. A 3 oz. serving of beef provides 16% of the Daily Value

Q. I know that beef provides many nutrients that are good for me, but what about the fat content?
Ans.
  • The beef industry has responded to consumer concerns about fat and is now producing a product that is leaner and contains less visible fat than it did just 10 years ago
  • Half the fatty acids in beef are mono-unsaturated, the same heart-healthy kind found in olive oil.
  • 32% of the saturated fat in beef is stearic acid. Studies have shown that stearic acid has a neutral effect on blood cholesterol levels.
  • There are at least 19 cuts of beef classified as lean or extra lean according to USDA labeling guidelines. On average, these cuts have 6.2 grams of total fat and 2.3 grams of saturated fatty acids per 3 oz. serving. They areBeef contains conjugated linoleic acid, a fatty acid that recently has sparked a lot of interest in the scientific community, due to its numerous potential health benefitsBeef contains conjugated linoleic acid, a fatty acid that recently has sparked a lot of interest in the scientific community, due to its numerous potential health benefits
    • Eye round
    • Top round
    • Round tip
    • Top sirloin
    • Bottom round
    • Top loin
    • Tenderloin
    • Flank Steak
Beef contains conjugated linoleic acid, a fatty acid that recently has sparked a lot of interest in the scientific community, due to its numerous potential health benefits  
Q. Why is conjugated linoleic acid potentially important?
Ans. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid found naturally in beef and dairy products. Animal studies have shown it to have many benefits. Further trials hope to confirm similar benefits in humans.
  • CLA has been found to be more powerful than any other fatty acid in preventing the formation and slowing the growth of cancerous tumors
  • CLA can affect body composition by decreasing body fat and increasing lean muscle mass
  • CLA may help normalize blood glucose levels and prevent diabetes
  • CLA may contribute to heart health by helping to lower serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels
  • CLA has been shown to stimulate the immune system and to have positive effects on bone health